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I have a deep love for astronomy but I also love photographyI try and take astrophotography photos but I mostly take photos of landscapes and objects. There are two sets of photos on this page:

  1. My personal photography
  2. Photos I’ve used in all my posts (some are awesome as desktop wallpapers!

 

 

 

NASA Invests in 22 Exploration Concepts that will Ignite the Future

Posted by on 1:14 pm in NASA News | 0 comments

NASA Invests in 22 Exploration Concepts that will Ignite the Future

NASA knows that humankind has many problems to face in the future. In fact today we not only have to worry about climate change and human problems but we still haven’t figured out or tested any solutions to prevent an asteroid collision. However, don’t fret we’re investing in these 22 awesome exploration concepts that will help us solve for some of these problems. So let’s jump into what these are. I should mention that NASA has broken these investments up in two phases. We’ll go over in what each phase is...

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Carnival of Space 505: Best Weekly Space Stories

Posted by on 10:09 pm in Carnival of Space | 0 comments

Carnival of Space 505: Best Weekly Space Stories

Hello space fans and welcome to another edition of Carnival of Space! If you’re unfamiliar with this awesome space community driven literature then let me give you a break down. The Carnival of Space is where a space blogger from the Universe Today community will round up all the latest and greatest space stories for the week so you don’t have to scour the web for the good stuff. We have a great lineup this week so let’s blast off.   Hubble Takes Advantage Of Opposition To Snap Jupiter – Universe Today Hubble...

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Astronomers Discover Surprising New Class of X-Ray Pulsating Stars

Posted by on 10:19 pm in Variable Stars | 0 comments

Astronomers Discover Surprising New Class of X-Ray Pulsating Stars

Pulsating stars have been one of the most intriguing objects in our universe and provide insightful value to how we can map out distances. Astronomers discover a new class of X-ray variable stars that have been in question for the last decade. The team that discovered this is from Canada and the United States. It includes universities such as Villanova, University of Colorado, Harvard, University of Texas, and University of Toronto. To understand why this discovery is amazing we should clear out some of the main pieces here. For one variable...

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How the Trip to Titan Changed Everything

Posted by on 8:04 pm in Solar System | 0 comments

How the Trip to Titan Changed Everything

There are many missions and discoveries that have truly reshaped the way we think about the planets, stars, solar system and beyond. However, the Cassini-Huygens mission is arguably one of the most important missions for humankind. A moon that truly opened our eyes is Titan. It’s Saturn’s largest moon and the only moon in our solar system to have a dense atmosphere. Many people are familiar with our missions to the Moon or Mars but not everyone is familiar with the mission to Titan. We’ll take a look at the story of getting...

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2016 Guide to Astronomy Discoveries

Posted by on 11:13 am in Astonishing Discoveries | 0 comments

2016 Guide to Astronomy Discoveries

I try and keep up with the latest astronomy discoveries and still have a hard time catching everything. 2016 has been nothing short of exciting and has left me in awe on more than one occasion. So here’s a list of all the space science discoveries made in 2016. Be sure to bookmark this page and come back as it’ll be updated until the last day of the year. Here we go!   Jan 7th, 2016 – Most Distant Massive Galaxy Cluster Identified 2016 starts off with a grand find. Coming to you from MIT is a discovery of a gargantuan...

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How Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) will Revolutionize Space Travel

Posted by on 11:19 am in Space Technology | 1 comment

How Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) will Revolutionize Space Travel

Direct Fusion Drive (DFD) could possibly pave the way of traveling in space and to planets. Sometimes I daydream and wish we could somehow speed up the process of getting to planets. It’s a very hard problem and we’re still testing out various solutions for different situations. History shows that humans have planned to go to the moon and beyond since the Apollo program in the early 1970’s. During that time the most advanced propulsion engines were nuclear fission thermal rockets. However, these rocks barely got any use as...

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Gorgeous Sagittarius Sunflowers Blooming in the Cosmos

Posted by on 8:15 pm in Nebula | 0 comments

Gorgeous Sagittarius Sunflowers Blooming in the Cosmos

This is a beautiful cosmic family portrait of what is known as the “Sagittarius Sunflower.” What you are looking at are 3 distinct cosmic nebulae. On the left we have the famous M8 or “Lagoon Nebula,” located about 4,400 light years from Earth. This nebula alone is about hundreds of light years across or about 1 quadrillion KM. To try and put that in perspective, if we travelled at 50 km/s (which we have before) it would take us 5 trillion hours or 26 million years!! And this is in our own Milky Way. We haven’t...

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New Exciting NASA Telescope TESS Looks for Planets Closer to Home

Posted by on 8:15 pm in Exoplanets, NASA Missions | 0 comments

New Exciting NASA Telescope TESS Looks for Planets Closer to Home

Is there life beyond Earth? A question so imperative that it has powered numerous sci-fi genres as well as historic missions like NASA’s Kepler Spacecraft. The implications of that question being answered will change the course of humanity forever. Currently, we have 2,237 confirmed planets. Meaning we have identified that many planets exist with actual observations that lie beyond our solar system. Of course, we estimate there to be at least 100 billion in our own galaxy, but observing them with our own eyes is a different story. Enter...

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Carnival of Space 462: This Week’s Top Space Stories

Posted by on 10:57 am in Carnival of Space | 2 comments

Carnival of Space 462: This Week’s Top Space Stories

Welcome to another edition of Carnival of Space! For those of you who are new to this it’s a collection of the best space stories from around the community. Today BrownSpaceman is hosting Carnival of Space 462. Let’s take a look at some of our awesome space stories today! First 3D Tools Printed Aboard Space Station An article by Universe Today about the first 3D tools printed in space! How cool is that? Read on to find out what tools they printed and how it’ll help our astronauts on those long missions. Read more... 470...

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Why I’m Excited for NASA’s Juno Mission

Posted by on 4:25 pm in NASA Missions | 0 comments

Why I’m Excited for NASA’s Juno Mission

On July 4th, 2016 the Juno spacecraft will arrive to the largest gas planet in the solar system, Jupiter. This is particular mission is very exciting and I’m going to tell you why. For those of you who don’t know, Jupiter is vital to life on Earth. How so? Well what makes our solar system unique isn’t just the fact that Earth has water and it’s in the goldilocks zone, but the fact that Jupiter paved the way for our rocky planets to form effectively. Without Jupiter Earth may have been bombarded by more asteroids or...

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The Coldest Region in the Universe: The Boomerang Nebula (Bow Tie Nebula)

Posted by on 12:15 pm in Nebula | 0 comments

The Coldest Region in the Universe: The Boomerang Nebula (Bow Tie Nebula)

If we take a trip 5,000 light-years away from Earth and towards the constellation Centaurus we will find one of the coldest regions in the universe. Say hello to the beautiful Boomerang Nebula. The Boomerang Nebula or what is also known as the “Bow Tie Nebula” is a protoplanetary nebula. What is fascinating about this nebula is that it’s only 1 degree above absolute zero! Meaning it’s 1 degrees Kelvin or -271 degrees Celsius. The bow shape you see here is due to the outflow of gas originating from the core of the star....

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Everything You Need to Know About the 2016 Transit of Mercury

Posted by on 3:29 pm in Events | 0 comments

Everything You Need to Know About the 2016 Transit of Mercury

Mercury, the small rocky planet in our Solar System closest to the Sun, will be making a rare transit across the Sun on Monday May 9th, 2016. The transit itself will last from 7 a.m to 4 p.m EDT. However, why is it such a big deal to see a planet move across the Sun from Earth’s perspective? What does this mean for humans and science? Why the big fuss? Well I’m here to help break it down as it’s filled with a rich history that’s been on-going for hundreds of years and has progressed humankind as a result. So...

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HCG 91: Furious Gravity Tug of War Between Galaxies

Posted by on 11:02 am in Galaxies | 0 comments

HCG 91: Furious Gravity Tug of War Between Galaxies

Here’s a fantastic photo of a group of galaxies playing gravitational tug of war located a staggering 320 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Piscis Austrinus. These group of galaxies are what as known as Hickson Compact Group 91 or HCG 91. They are named so because a Canadian astronomer named Paul Hickson discovered 100 compact groups of galaxies. The tails of these galaxies are actually 100,000 light-years long! Because of their “close” interaction the galaxies are triggering furious star formations. On a cosmic...

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Carnival of Space 456: Best Space Stories of the Week!

Posted by on 7:22 pm in Carnival of Space | 0 comments

Carnival of Space 456: Best Space Stories of the Week!

Here is another issue of Carnival of Space! We are on the 456th issue and counting. If this is your first time hearing about this community driven feature then let me give you a quick intro. Carnival of Space was started by our friends over at Universe Today and a community of astronomy bloggers gathered together to help showcase some of the best space stories. Each community member hosts the Carnival of Space and spreads the love to the interwebs. So please, sit back, relax, and let these stories take you away on the cosmic beaches of the...

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The Destruction of Supernova Remnant Simeis 147: The Spaghetti Nebula

Posted by on 6:44 pm in Nebula, Supernova | 0 comments

The Destruction of Supernova Remnant  Simeis 147: The Spaghetti Nebula

Located right in our own Milky Way is a story of a star that ended in utter destruction. Say hello to Supernova Remnant Simeis 147 or the Spaghetti Nebula. Discovered in 1952 this supernova remnant is located 3,000 (+/- 300) light years away from Earth on the border of constellations Auriga and Taurus. The Spaghetti nebula is about 40,000 years old or the first photon or light particle reached Earth 40,000 years ago. In its wake it left a neutron star known as pulsar PSR J0538+2817. What this means is that there is a star that is highly...

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